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February 1, 2017

King Hall Faculty Members Join CAPALF Statement Condemning Trump Executive Order

The Conference of Asian Pacific American Law Faculty, or CAPALF, has issued a statement on President Trump's recent executive order. The statement is signed by several of King Hall's own Asian-American law faculty, including Afra Afsharipour, Anupam Chander, Gabriel "Jack" Chin, Thomas W. Joo, Rose Cuison Villazor, Lisa Ikemoto, Madhavi Sunder, and Yoshinori "Toso" Himel '75.

An excerpt:

We, members of the Conference of Asian Pacific American Law Faculty, condemn President Trump's executive order, issued on January 27, 2017, which suspends U.S. refugee admission for "nationals of countries of particular concern," and applies to citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries, including persons already legally authorized to enter the United States and, at least initially, lawful permanent residents.

The United States has made the grave mistake of discriminatory exclusion before.  The Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 was the first federal law to enact a wholesale ban on immigration on the basis of race, ethnicity, or nationality.  It remained in effect until 1943, and was not fully dismantled until 1965.  Congress banned other immigration from Asia from 1917 to 1952.

Asian American history teaches us that wholesale exclusions and bans of an entire people on the basis of race, ethnicity, or national origin are not only morally and constitutionally problematic, but also counterproductive to actual national security objectives.

Visit the CAPALF website to view the full statement.

April 8, 2016

CAPALF 2016 at UC Davis School of Law

The School of Law is proud to host the 2016 Conference of Asian Pacific American Law Faculty (CALALF) at King Hall today and tomorrow. There is a new addition to an already outstanding speaker line-up: California Supreme Court Justice Goodwin Liu.

Here is the program from the CAPALF website.

Keynote Speakers & Distinguished Guests

Justice Goodwin Liu  | Associate Justice
Supreme Court of California

Simon (Young) Tam | The Slants

Angela Harris | Distinguished Professor of Law & Boochever and Bird Endowed Chair
University of California, Davis School of Law

Karen Korematsu | Founder & Executive Director
Fred T. Korematsu Institute

The Honorable Rob Bonta | Assemblymember
California State Assembly

Frank Wu | Distinguished Professor of Law
University of California, Hastings College of the Law

Conference Schedule

Friday, April 8, 2016 | Room 1301

9:00 AM

Welcome Remarks

9:15 AM

Works-in-Progress Session One

10:30 AM

Coffee Break

10:45 AM














Plenary: #BlackLivesMatter and Asian Pacific Americans?

Aarti Kohli | Deputy Director of Advancing Justice
Asian Law Caucus

Linda Lye | Senior Staff Attorney
American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California

Bertrall Ross | Assistant Professor of Law
Co-Director, Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice
University of California, Berkeley School of Law

Margaret Russell | Professor of Law
University of California, Santa Clara School of Law

Moderator: Rose Cuison Villazor | Professor of Law
University of California, Davis School of Law

12:00 PM

Keynote Address & Lunch
Simon (Young) Tam
| The Slants

1:00 PM

Arboretum Walk

1:30 PM

















Works-in-Progress Session Two

Discussion Panel: Neo ­Pariah: Studies in the Emerging Academic Caste System in Higher Education

Angela Harris, Distinguished Professor of Law, Boochever and Bird Endowed Chair
University of California, Davis School of Law

Kieu Linh Caroline Valverde, Associate Professor
University of California, Davis, Department of Asian American Studies

Darrell Hamamoto, Professor
University of California, Davis, Department of Asian American Studies

Wei Ming Dariotis, Associate Professor
San Francisco State University, College of Ethnic Studies, Asian American Studies

Melody Yee, Bachelor of Science
University of California, Davis, Department of Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior

Jing Mai, Undergraduate Student
University of California, Davis, Department of Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior

2:45 PM













Plenary: Islamophobia & the Lost Legacy of Korematsu

Lorraine Bannai | Professor of Lawyering Skills
Director, Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality
Seattle University School of Law

Karima Bennoune | UN Special Rapporteur in the Field of Cultural Rights
Professor of Law | University of California, Davis School of Law

Dale Minami | Partner
Minami Tamaki LLP

Shirin Sinnar | Assistant Professor of Law
Stanford Law School

Moderator: Afra Afsharipour | Professor of Law
University of California, Davis School of Law

4:00 PM

Coffee Break

4:15 PM









Plenary: Asian Pacific Americans and College Admissions

Ashutosh Bhagwat | Professor of Law
UC Davis School of Law

Marina C. Hsieh | Senior Fellow
Santa Clara Law

Dan P. Tokaji | Charles W. Ebersold and Florence Whitcomb Ebersold Professor of Constitutional Law
The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law

Moderator: Anupam Chander | Professor of Law
University of California, Davis School of Law

5:30 PM

Awards Ceremony & Dinner
Guest of Honor: Karen Korematsu 

Saturday, April 9, 2016 | Room 2302

9:00 AM

Works-in-Progress Session Three

10:15 AM

Coffee Break

10:30 AM


Welcome Remarks
Dean Kevin Johnson
University of California Davis, School of LawThe Honorable Rob Bonta | Assemblymember
California State Assembly

10:45 AM






Students Plenary: Voices of the Next Generation

Stephen Chang | University of California, Berkeley School of Law

Sylvia Hsin-Ling Tsai | University of California, Davis School of Law

Steven Vong | University of California, Davis School of Law

Moderator: Uyen P. Le | Mellon Sawyer Postdoctoral Scholar University of California, Davis School of Law

12:00 PM

Keynote Address & Lunch
Distinguished Professor of Law Frank Wu
University of California, Hastings College of the Law

1:00 PM













Plenary: Latinos, Asian Pacific Americans, and Immigration

Jennifer Chacón | Professor of Law
University of California, Irvine School of Law

Bill Hing | Professor of Law
University of San Francisco School of Law

Hiroshi Motomura | Susan Westerberg Prager Professor of Law
University of California, Los Angeles School of Law

Deep Gulasekaram | Associate Professor of Law
Santa Clara University School of Law

Moderator: Jack Chin | Professor of Law
University of California, Davis

2:15 PM












Plenary: Emerging Scholars

Christina Chong | Assistant Professor of Law
University of San Francisco School of Law

Andrew Kim | Assistant Professor of Law
Concordia University School of Law

Saira Mohamed | Assistant Professor of Law
University of California, Berkeley School of Law

Nancy Chi Cantalupo | Assistant Professor of Law
Barry University Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law

Moderator: Hiroshi Motomura | Susan Westerberg Prager Professor of Law
University of California, Los Angeles School of Law

 

January 15, 2016

Jack Chin to Discuss Hong Yen Chang Case in Riverside

Professor Gabriel "Jack" Chin will make a presentation on his work on the Hong Yen Chang case before the Riverside County Bar Association in May. He'll be joined by attorney Josh Meltzer of Munger Tolles and Olson LLP.

Chang, an 1886 Columbia Law School grad, was denied a license to practice in California because of laws that discriminated against Chinese immigrants. Last year, the California Supreme Court granted him posthumous admission to the bar, thanks to the efforts of Professor Chin and members of our Asian Pacific American Law Students Association (APALSA).

 

 

November 12, 2015

NAPABA in New Orleans 2015

At the National Asian Pacific American Bar Association (NAPABA) meeting in New Orleans last week, I spoke on a panel for attorneys interested in transitioning to the legal academy; Professor Rose Cuison Villazor moderated. The two of us are involved in reactivating NAPABA’s law professor’s committee, the goal of which is to serve as a link between the practicing bar and the legal academy. 


Me, Professor Villazor, and alums Atticus Lee '13, clerking for the USDC, Southern District of Texas (our co-author in the 1965 immigration Act book) and Teddie Hsu '10 of Snell & Wilmer in Los Angeles


Our panel on entering the legal academy: Professor Villazor, me, Kim D. Chanbonpin of John Marshall in Chicago, and Elaine Chiu of St. Johns

I also gave the keynote address at the luncheon of the International Law Section, talking about my work with the UC Davis APALSA getting the California Supreme Court to posthumously admit Hong Yen Chang, the first Chinese American attorney in New York who was denied admission to the California bar in 1890 because of his race.  The California Supreme Court admitted Hong Yen Chang in March.

March 16, 2015

Breaking News: California Grants Law License to Hong Yen Chang

Today, the California Supreme Court today issued its opinion in In Re Hong Yen Chang. The first line says it all: "We grant Hong Yen Chang posthumous admission as an attorney and counselor at law in all courts of the state of California." (emphasis added).

More than a century ago, Chang was denied the opportunity to practice law in California because of his race.  Professor Jack Chin, a leading civil rights law professor, has been working on the case with the Asian Pacific American Law Students Association students and the law firm of Munger Tolles & Olson LLP.

Congratulations to all involved in this important effort to right a historic wrong. Congratulations, too, to the family of Hong Yen Chang, many of whom are lawyers right here in California.

See coverage of today's developments from major news outlets including Reuters, Los Angeles Times, San Francisco Chronicle, and the Associated Press, among others.

March 13, 2015

California Supreme Court to Rule on Bar Admission of Hong Yen Chang

Cross-posted from Immigration Prof Blog.

Last spring, ImmigrationProf reported on the efforts of UC Davis law students to seek the posthumous admission of Hong Yen Chang to the California State Bar. More than a century ago,  Chang was denied the opportunity to practice law in California because of his race.

Students in the UC Davis School of Law Asian Pacific American Law Students Association (APALSA) asked the California Supreme Court to admit Hong Yen Chang to the bar. Professor Jack Chin, a leading civil rights law professor, has been working on the case with the APALSA students and the law firm of Munger Tolles & Olson LLP.

The California Supreme Court announced today that it would file an opinion in the case next Monday.  Stay tuned!

May 1, 2014

UC Davis law students seek to right historic wrong with posthumous California Bar admission of Chinese lawyer

More than a century after a New York lawyer was denied the opportunity to practice law in California because of state laws that barred Chinese immigrants from most careers and opportunities, UC Davis law students are seeking his posthumous admission to the California State Bar.

The students in the UC Davis School of Law Asian Pacific American Law Students Association (APALSA) are asking the State Bar of California, and eventually the California Supreme Court, to admit Hong Yen Chang, who was denied a license to practice law in California in 1890.

Chang attended Yale as part of the Chinese Educational Mission, a pioneering program initiated by the Chinese government. He then left the United States and later returned on his own to study law. He earned a degree from Columbia Law School in 1886 and sat for the New York bar exam by special act of the legislature. When he was admitted to the New York state bar, The New York Times reported that Chang was the first Chinese immigrant admitted to any bar in the United States. In 1890, he came to California with the intention of serving San Francisco's Chinese community as an attorney.

At that time, the federal Chinese Exclusion Act banned Chinese immigrants from naturalizing as citizens, and a California law prohibited noncitizens from practicing law in the state. Taken together, these laws made it impossible for people of Chinese descent to earn law licenses in the state. Chang petitioned the California Supreme Court, but was denied admission.

He went on to a distinguished career in banking and diplomacy, but his story was not forgotten. Now, the students are seeking a symbolic victory on behalf of Chang and others who suffered as a result of laws that discriminated against the Chinese.

"Admitting Mr. Chang would be a powerful symbol of our state's repudiation of laws that singled out Chinese immigrants for discrimination," said Gabriel "Jack" Chin, a professor at UC Davis School of Law and APALSA's faculty adviser on the project. "At the time Chang was excluded from the practice of law in California, discrimination against Chinese persons was widespread. Congress prohibited all Chinese immigration. Even the California Constitution dedicated an entire article to restricting the rights of Chinese residents."

The UC Davis School of Law California Supreme Court Clinic is representing APALSA in the case. It has formally requested the State Bar to support the project and will file a petition with the California Supreme Court seeking Chang's admission. The clinic, the first and only law school clinic of its kind, represents parties and amici in a wide range of both civil and criminal matters pending before the California Supreme Court.

Other states have posthumously admitted applicants who were excluded from their respective bars based on similar discriminatory laws. In 2001, the Washington Supreme Court admitted Takuji Yamashita, a Japanese immigrant who had been refused admission to the profession in 1902. And in 2010, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court posthumously admitted George B. Vashon, an African American who had been denied admission in 1847 because of race.  

Chang's descendants remain in the San Francisco Bay Area, including grandniece Rachelle Chong, the first Asian American to serve as a commissioner of the Federal Communications Commission and of the California Public Utilities Commission. "In my generation, our family is extremely fortunate to have three lawyers admitted to the California State Bar: my cousins Suzanne Ah Tye, Kirk Ah Tye, and myself," said Chong. "It would be fitting and right to have my granduncle's exclusion reversed by the California Supreme Court to ensure that justice, albeit late, is done. Our family is honored that the UC Davis APALSA students have taken up the issue of righting a terrible wrong."

"From its inception more than 40 years ago, UC Davis School of Law has been dedicated to the ideals of social justice and equality espoused by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., for whom our law school building is named," said Dean Kevin R. Johnson. "This effort by our students and faculty to admit Hong Yen Chang to the California State Bar stands strongly within that tradition and is deserving of support."

For more information on the effort to gain bar admission for Hong Yen Chang, contact Professor Gabriel "Jack" Chin.

May 19, 2011

SALT Great Teacher 2012: Keith Aoki

The Society of American Law Teachers has released the following statement regarding the naming of Keith Aoki, our colleague who passed away last month, receipient of its 2012 Great Teacher Award.

"The Board of Governors of the Society of American Law Teachers (SALT) announces with pride and sadness that it will be honoring Professor Keith Aoki posthumously with its 2012 SALT Great Teacher Award at the Saturday, January 7, 2012 SALT Annual Dinner in conjunction with the AALS annual meeting in Washington, D.C.

"A talented, creative, committed professor, teacher, friend, colleague, musician, artist, husband, and father, Keith has left his mark on the legal academy and in the hearts of students and colleagues alike.

"Keith’s educational path reflected the fact that his legal analysis and scholarship were intimately connected to his love of art and music.  That made Keith into a risk-taking intellectual who was passionate about ideas and justice.  Keith earned a B.F.A. degree from Wayne State, M.A. in Fine Arts from Hunter College, J.D. from Harvard Law School, and LL.M. from the University of Wisconsin Law School. At the time of his
death, Keith was a professor at the University of California at Davis School of Law, having come from the University of Oregon School of Law, where he taught from 1993 to 2006. He also taught at Lewis & Clark, Columbia, and Boston College.

"He brought his performance art into the classroom, delighting and unnerving students, challenging their assumptions and expectations.  He made generations of pompous law professors and law school students laugh at themselves with his legal comics.

"Reviewing the comments posted by those who knew Keith after his untimely death was announced, we know that he was also a teacher of teachers, mentoring colleagues through the first years of classroom preparation, urging them to be brave in their scholarship, and reminding them that their vulnerability wasn’t such a bad thing."Keith Aoki was a generous spirit, and his teaching, scholarship, and service were the creative products of that generosity, intelligence, compassion, and determination to make the world a better place."

Read tributes to Professor Aoki here, here and here.  A memorial service to honor Professor Aoki will take place at the law school on Thursday, May 26, at 3 pm.